Eureka shines in the space-time realm!

"It allows the Event Horizon Telescope to achieve an extremely high angular resolution enough to read a newspaper in New York from a café on a sidewalk in Paris."



Two decades of dedicated and committed work in this subject, which was preceded by the researches and theories of myriads of astrophysics scientists, has finally seen the light. On Wednesday, the 10th of April 2019, it has been recorded in the history of the world that the first image of a black hole was captured. Not only that, but the black hole in subject is considered one of the biggest elusive cosmic beasts that resides in the heart of the elliptical galaxy M87.

Global collaboration in the Event Horizon project  was the main key of the success of this project. With over 200 scientists working for more than two decades guided by John Michell’s suggestion that Newton’s law predicts the existence of black holes in 1783, Albert Einstein’s relativity theory in 1916, Louise Webster’s and Paul Murdin’s – British Astronomers- discovery of an invisible object in an orbit around a star in the early 1970s, Steven Hawking’s theories and researches which he proved in 1972-1974, and many more geniuses.

Our modern scientists, aided by their ancestors, forged eight radio telescopes, which were deployed at high-altitudes in the Spanish Sierra Nevada, the Chilean Atacama Desert, Antarctica, mountains in Arizona, Mexico, volcanoes in Hawaii, and other places around the world, to form a massive virtual telescopic instrument the size of Earth which allows the Event Horizon Telescope to achieve an extremely high angular resolution enough to read a newspaper in New York from a café on a sidewalk in Paris.

This outrageous breakthrough in the world of science has taken the world by a storm. It has opened myriads of doors full to the brim with mysteries about the universe and of course, further stimulated our curious minds and thirst for exploring our fellow galaxies.