Kiliim and The Business Aspects of Creative Startups

Their corporate mainly specializes in manufacturing handmade rugs made in Fowwa, a small village on the western bank of the Nile's Delta.



Edited by: Mohamed Ayman

In order to develop the awareness of our students to initiate successful and steady startups, the GUC hosted Kiliim team as guests to discuss the business aspects of their startup. Briefly, Kiliim was founded by Noha, a GUC graduate, former Applied Arts student, TA and is currently the head designer. The co-founder of the corporate is her husband Ibrahim, who is responsible for all the business aspects of the firm in co-operation with Nada (their newest partner, who is in charge mainly of the production phase). Their corporate mainly specializes in manufacturing handmade rugs made in Fowwa, a small village on the western bank of the Nile’s Delta.

Ibrahim talked about how they funded their business efficiently and provided advice to the students on how to think when creating a similar startup, and what aspects should be taken care of like costs of manufacturing, expenses of production (e.g. storage, salaries of co-workers and transportation of goods). He also mentioned problems that have to be solved in order to avoid corruption of the business.

Noha and Nada, the former graphic design students talked about the practical and psychological transitions between making projects for their professors and actually making goods that meet the expectations of customers and investors. They found it to be a very interesting challenge for them and they enjoyed the trial and error of producing a craft to satisfy their customers rather than their TAs.

Students attended the event and were inspired by how a student, who was once in their place, made a successful and growing well-known business. They were also able link what they’ve studied academically to the real world market needs and thus learn about strategies to get their products to reach the audience or customers. Kiliim’s new ideas and additions to the market interested the students; they were eager to know how they could manage to convince weavers and craftsmen to work with new strategies and modernly innovative ideas.